| Online Store
Community Search
Print Page   |   Contact Us   |   Sign In   |   Join NALS
Community Search
the NALS docket
Blog Home All Blogs
The official blog of the NALS docket, used as a timely resource for sharing content from our email newsletter. This includes Grammar Nuggets, Career Corner, NALS news, NALS Foundation, chapter and members spotlights, and more!

 

Search all posts for:   

 

Top tags: legal professional  legal  paralegal  legal education  microsoft word  administrative  grammar  grammar nuggets  legal assistant  legal career  legal professional training  nals  career corner  paralegal career  editing legal papers  legal job skills  office procedures  Accredited Legal Professional  ask eula mae  legal access  legal jobs  legal networking  legal office  nals chapters  technology training  writing legal documents  All the best! You are a true picture of what NALS  American Bar Association  and the chapter spotlight is fantastic.  Awesome! Yes this was a wonderful event 

Ask Eula Mae: Work v. Law School Decision

Posted By NALS Editorial Board, Wednesday, November 9, 2016

Ask Eula MaeDear Eula Mae:

I have an ALP certificate and work part time for an attorney as an office clerk but lack the hours needed for a four-year law study program in lieu of going to law school.  Most of my duties are as a personal assistant and I do not have much to do.  I am taking the Multi-State Professional Exam (MPRE) this week “just for fun.”  How do I get my foot in the door without much legal experience?  Should I bite the bullet and go to law school or stay on my current path and hope to find work in a more robust office?

New Hampshire Newbie


 

Dear New Hampshire Newbie:

Well, you have a lot going on and a lot of questions!  This is good!  There are several things in your letter to consider:  (1) you need hours for a four-year law study program, (2) you need more to do in your job, (3) it sounds like you really want to work in a law office, and (4) you are trying to decide whether or not to go to law school.  Let’s take these one at a time.  

  1. You need hours for a four-year law study program.  Are you in college or looking for certification hours?  Either way, if you love the law, you can find classes to attend through professional organizations such as NALS, technical schools, or online classes at your local university.  

  2. In your current job, start with the boss.  The boss needs to know you need more to do and you are willing to learn.  Bosses are a great resource for legal professionals for career ideas and maybe as a mentor.  You could interview the boss about his experience in law school.

  3. If your goal is to work in a law office, there is much to learn right where you are.  If you have exhausted the resources there (after talking with the boss, of course), then it might be time to move on to a busier office.  Legal work can take place in many areas.  You can work directly for an attorney at hospitals, corporate offices, title companies, insurance companies, utility companies, etc.  As your own research project to help you decide your next step, it might be good to look at other areas that have legal assistants.

  4. A big decision such as whether or not to go to law school is not one to make quickly.  There are many reasons for this and the main one is to absolutely know why you want to go to law school.  It is a big commitment.  First, you will have to finish your undergraduate degree and then secure the funding to pay for law school.  This is a job in itself.  Then you will need to take the Law School Admission Test (LSAT).  All of this could take some time, but that is really not a problem because you can go to school any time in your life.

 

What makes your main question difficult is the fact that there are so many options!  Now, how to make a big decision:  make a comparison chart with a list of what you could do (law school v. legal assistant, paralegal certification, etc.).  For each item, make columns of time involved, resources available and needed, costs, and list the positives and negatives of each.  You have plenty of time to decide.  You can always go to law school and working as a legal assistant until you are ready will better prepare you for law school.  The real answer to your question is for you to follow your heart.  You will be fine whatever you choose to do.

 

Eula Mae Jett

 

Submit Your Questions To Ask Eula Mae By Clicking Here.

 

 

Tags:  ask eula mae  legal  legal education  legal job skills  legal jobs  legal professional  paralegal 

Share |
PermalinkComments (1)
 

Avoiding Conflict of Interest

Posted By Ask Eula Mae, Wednesday, October 26, 2016

 

Dear Eula Mae:


Good morning.  I am a new receptionist and typist at the biggest law firm in our city.  My goal is to be a paralegal, so I spend lots of spare time observing, reading, and preparing to take the NALS ALP exam.  My boss is out of town and our caseload is being monitored by a paralegal in our office until he gets back.  Today we had several people come into the office to meet with various attorneys and paralegals.  I recognized two of these visitors and, of course, spoke with them in the lobby.  I know I need to report to my boss if I know anyone who comes in the office.  Since my boss is out of town, whom do I need to tell that I know these people?

 

Learning in Louisiana

 

 

Dear Learning in Louisiana:

 

That is a very good question because that can be a difficult situation.  Reporting you know visitors to the office is one of the first things you should have learned as a receptionist.  In this case, you will need to report to your paralegal supervisor as soon as possible that you know the visitors.  If the paralegal is not available, report this to the office manager or human resources director as soon as you can.  The point is to keep the client’s information confidential, so do not be offended if you are not allowed to work on their case.  Imagine if you were in their shoes.  Confidentiality is of utmost importance for all legal personnel.  See Rule 1.6, Confidentiality of Information in the American Bar Association’s Model Rules of Professional Conduct.

 

Eula Mae Jett

 

Submit Your Questions To Ask Eula Mae By Clicking Here.

 


Tags:  ask eula mae 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 
more Calendar

3/21/2018 » 9/15/2018
NALS Traveling Gavel Challenge

3/21/2018 » 3/21/2019
NALS 2018 Online Leadership Course + Discussion

4/1/2018 » 6/30/2018
NALS Foundation Full Circle 5K

4/16/2018 » 4/16/2019
Online ALP Exam

Featured
Amylyn Riedling PP PLS-SC2018 NALS Board of Directors
Nakia A. Bradley-Lawson2018 NALS Board of Directors

CLE Opportunities
Association Management Software Powered by YourMembership  ::  Legal