| Online Store
Community Search
Print Page   |   Contact Us   |   Sign In   |   Join NALS
Community Search
the NALS docket
Blog Home All Blogs
The official blog of the NALS docket, used as a timely resource for sharing content from our email newsletter. This includes Grammar Nuggets, Career Corner, NALS news, NALS Foundation, chapter and members spotlights, and more!

 

Search all posts for:   

 

Top tags: legal professional  legal  paralegal  legal education  microsoft word  administrative  grammar  grammar nuggets  legal assistant  legal career  legal professional training  nals  career corner  paralegal career  editing legal papers  legal job skills  office procedures  Accredited Legal Professional  ask eula mae  legal access  legal jobs  legal networking  legal office  nals chapters  technology training  writing legal documents  All the best! You are a true picture of what NALS  American Bar Association  and the chapter spotlight is fantastic.  Awesome! Yes this was a wonderful event 

Rules of Engagement

Posted By Kerie S. Trindle Byrne, PLS, Monday, August 22, 2016
Updated: Wednesday, August 17, 2016

Rules of EngagementI attend continuing legal education for my career as a paralegal—a lot of continuing legal education. Besides being a requirement of the two legal certifications I have, I am also a member of my professional association, and involvement in the association means participation in the events we present. I am a natural sponge and love learning about new topics, exploring new ideas, and finding new ways of doing things. I like to try on concepts, see if they fit me like a comfy pair of pajamas or if they are like an itchy wool sweater in Phoenix in the middle of summer. Luckily, most of the continuing legal education seminars and meetings I attend are interesting, but there are those that are not. I find, however, that if my mind begins to wander off of the topic I am listening to, typically it wanders to a grocery list, work or life to do list, or my next vacation. Sometimes when I am really not engaged, my mind wanders to those big ideas I have. You know the ones, the goals that have not seen any action in a while. Those really big life altering projects I wish I would start chewing on a bite at a time. When those things start to happen, I remember there are rules of engagement that require me to buckle down and plug back in. These concepts do not apply only to continuing legal education, but to any situation in which you are not fully present—meetings, presentations, seminars, driver’s education training, educational classes, phone calls, and webinars. I will share my rules of engagement here with you, so the next time you catch yourself checking out, you can reconnect and impress not only your boss, teacher, or coworkers, but yourself.  


It is not solely the presenter’s job to entertain you and keep you engaged. Don’t get me wrong. There are things a presenter can do to keep her audience engaged in the topic, and maybe I will write about that next, but it is not solely her job. There is a part that each member of the audience must play. The onus is on you, the audience member, to stay committed and focused. Chances are you are there for a reason. Either you are being paid to be there, in the case of a work meeting or phone calls from clients; you are required to be there, in the case of driver’s education training or school; or you are paying to be there, in the case of continuing legal education, seminars, or webinars. No matter the reason for you to be there, be there and be an active listener.


Active listening is an art form that, once mastered, will keep you connected to people in a way that will enhance your professional and personal life. Active listening involves being present in the moment and taking in everything the other person has to say without waiting for your own chance to speak or interject. You are not just listening for the words the other person is saying, but you are listening to understand and retain the concepts. Watch body language, listen to intonation, rate of speech, and other nonverbal cues that the person is using to convey their message. Look at the other person and let them know you are engaged and focused. If you agree with something, nod your head. If you think of something or you have a question, write it down quickly and go back to listening. Smile and use other facial expressions to communicate that you are actively listening. It will make a difference.


If you are starting to feel your mind wander, figure out what is in it for you. To do that, ask yourself a series of questions. I start off by asking myself, “How does this apply to my daily work?” Could this topic be tangentially related to the work I do on a daily basis in the future? If the answer is no, or it is yes but it is still not enough to keep me motivated to actively listen, then I move on to my next question. 


How does this apply to my personal life? For instance, I have found myself sitting in on more seminars about estate planning than I care to attend. I am not an estate planning paralegal. I am not close to retirement age and feel as though I do not have enough assets to worry about estate planning at my age. Whether that is true or not remains to be seen; however, my parents are both close to retirement age. Is there something in the estate planning continuing legal education that I can learn that would make me better situated to help my parents navigate retirement?


If I am still unable to find a way that the interaction relates to my work or personal life, I ask myself how it relates to my extracurricular activities. Maybe I am a member of a homeowner’s association and need to learn about city ordinances. Maybe I am a member of my kids’ Parent/Teacher Association and need to know about school zoning. Maybe it is not the topic itself that pertains to my extracurricular activities, but the manner in which it is being presented. Did the presenter tell you about some computer program or tool you could use? If asking these questions does not reengage your brain, I have some other tips.   


Treat the interaction as a class. If you do not understand the concept, or you are unable to relay key facts, ideas, and principles to someone else by the end of the interaction, you have failed. This appeals to my competitive nature. I feel it is my job in the world to know as much as I can about as many things as I can. So, if someone is talking to me on the phone and I am having difficulty staying focused, I will sometimes employ this tactic. If they mention a word or phrase that I have never heard before, I ask them what it means. This happens all the time in the legal world, especially with acronyms. People use different words and phrases and I do not always know what they mean, so I ask. Also, if I think I have understood what someone is saying, but I want to be sure that my brain was engaged the whole time, I will repeat the key phrase or concept back to them and ask them to verify that I got it right. Asking questions frequently during an interaction is another way to trigger your brain to stay in the game.


Take notes. When I find myself disengaging, this is the singular thing that helps me stay engaged. I take voracious notes. Sometimes, I test myself to see if I can write down everything that is said. When I am participating in a client meeting, I am listening not only for the facts of their case, but I am also listening to subtext instructions from my attorney. I sometimes come out of an hour-long meeting with a client having gone through an entire legal pad. This helps me not only to stay focused on what is being discussed, it also helps refresh my memory when something from that meeting comes up again during the case. 


When I am attending a seminar for my professional association, one way for me to stay engaged is to be a force for marketing. I can easily connect to Facebook and/or Twitter, which I have linked to each other, and type quick 144-character key concepts about the seminar I am attending. So long as my device is charged and I am not actively engaged in another way, I am likely engaged in social media marketing for my association. If I am listening for the concepts I think other people might be interested in, they may read my Facebook post or my tweet and decide to attend our next event. It is a way for me to stay plugged in, engaged, and do something proactive. Sometimes, I post something that leads to questions I can ask the speaker in real time and respond to on social media. This type of engagement keeps me focused on the interaction and allows me to feel like I am sharing important information with my contacts. Understand, this type of engagement is not appropriate in many situations, so use your best judgment.


Remembering these rules of engagement can help you get the most out of every interaction. Focusing on being an active listener, determining how the interaction relates to your work life, personal life, or extracurricular activities, treating the interaction as a class you must pass and not fail, taking notes, and marketing when appropriate will keep you focused and help you soak up as much information as possible. The next time you find your mind wandering to what you need from the store, what work deadlines you have to complete, or your next European vacation, consider employing one or more of these methods to keep you involved and help you be all there.


 

Kerie S. Trindle Byrne, PLS, has been a legal professional for 19 years and has worked in many different capacities in the law firm environment.  Through determination, hard work, and on-the-job training, Kerie gained the background knowledge and skills to perform as a legal support professional.  Believing education to reinforce her skills was important, Kerie attended Phoenix College and earned her Associate of Arts Degree in Paralegal Studies, obtained her PLS certification from NALS, and obtained her CP certification from NALA.  Kerie has practiced in many areas of law and is currently employed as a family law paralegal with David Horowitz of May, Potenza, Baran & Gillespie, P.C. Kerie is a self-proclaimed Disney addict and when she is not working, teaching, or volunteering with NALS, she is spending time with her husband, kids, family, and friends at Disneyland. 

 

Tags:  CLE  CLE sessions  continuing legal education  legal  legal professional  paralegal  volunteerism 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

I Want To Write, But Where Do I Start?

Posted By Allison Streepey, B.A., CRS, PLS, Monday, August 8, 2016
Updated: Tuesday, August 2, 2016

I Want To Write But Where Do I Start?Writing is like a muscle. You have to use it, work it, grow it. Like any other skill, it can be learned but it take lots of practice.  Nowadays, anyone can be “published” immediately through any social media, blog, or YouTube.  Maybe you want more than that.  Think and dream about what your purpose in writing could be.  Is it to report events and activities or to educate others in NALS?  Do you dream of writing the great American novel?
 
Where do you start to do this?  Start where you are.  You could start quietly by journaling—just for you—and look at it later with “fresh eyes,” i.e., like you have never seen it before.  Or be brave and join the editorial board of your local, state, or national NALS group.  You will see lots of writing and get the hang of it.  Be braver and consider writing for your local NALS chapter.  Talk about something you know and tell us the story.  You probably have something to teach or are an expert on something that has not been presented before and you could really help a lot of people. 
 
Suddenly, opportunities will appear.  You might notice a topic that has not been covered in your local NALS chapter meetings or the NALS state chapter events.  Maybe you have a different take on a topic or know an easier way to do something.  Maybe there is a subject that you are curious about and want to learn more and would be interested in doing research and interviews to discover the answers to your questions.  Others probably have the same questions and want answers too.
 
Think of it as a puzzle.  Basically, it is taking an idea and expanding it, giving it purpose.  Sometimes purpose comes first or is in the publication’s plans—sometimes it comes after you work on your information for a while.  Think about what you are trying to accomplish with your article. Are you trying to motivate, ask a question and get the audience to think, or are you just reporting?
 
Writing is really about editing.  What happens is that you write a while and let it rest, go back and look at it and edit.  Repeat that process many times until you think it is your best effort and the article is complete.  Your job is to make the words say exactly what you mean for them to say.  That is where the work comes in.  Sometimes the information comes to you fast and sometimes it does not.  Sometimes the editing and rearrangement is clear and sometimes it is not.  That is why deadlines help—whether they are self-imposed or from the editor of the publication.
 
What are you afraid of—that you might be criticized?  Okay.  Think of it as an experiment.  It usually takes many tries to succeed.  Try again.
 
Start simple and look for an opportunity to write a short article, just a paragraph to report about a class or event you attended for your local NALS chapter newsletter.  Remember that those who were not able to go to the event really want to hear what you have to say.  After producing several short reports, you will find that writing gets easier and you will soon begin to write longer pieces.
 
There are so many books and resources to help you with your writing.  Having a good grammar base is very helpful.  Use The Gregg Reference Manual [1] or websites like Proof That Blog, [2] written by NALS' Kathy Sieckman, PP, PLS -SC, ACP, or Grammar Girl's Quick and Dirty Grammar Tips. [3]
 
One of the best books to have readily available is Strunk and White’s The Element of Style, [4] which is simple and beautiful, suggested by many colleges and law schools.
 
But that brings up another good point—how to grow your skill.  Practice.  A lot of practice. This means you will need time, effort, and a recording device like a tape or message recorder, a computer, a journal, a notebook, or whatever works for you.
 
You might need to schedule time to write.  Serious writers write every day. (Can you imagine?)  Some have an idea for an article and schedule 30 minutes a day and work on one section at a time.  Some writers use free-style journaling by just letting the words flow and reviewing later to see what comes out of it.  And there are writers that start with an outline or a question that they would like to answer. 
 
Having someone review and give real feedback (more here, less here, and asking questions like, “What did you mean here?”) is one of the most important parts of writing.  Please understand that the editor’s and proofreader’s jobs are to make you look good.  So you see, advice is always welcome.  Do not take it personally.  Your paper is not about you—it is a thing, a product to be polished enough to shine.
 
It is good to have a filing system to keep your good ideas and build on them, to have a list of article ideas, to keep articles you are working on handy, and to hold your research.  Some writers never throw out any writing that was edited out of an article, but recycle it into something else.  This would be good if all your work is in one highly defined and unique area—like an expert!
 
What are you waiting for?  You can do this and you might surprise yourself and discover that you just need to build that muscle.  I know you have something to say and there are plenty of us who want to hear it.  Go for it!  It is an adventure.  Try it, then wait and see what develops from your effort.


Allison Streepey, B.A., CRS, PLS, is the Business Administrator for the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) Office of Educational Development. She has over 15 years’ experience in pre- and post-award research grants administration and in serving as the Senior Grants Administrator for the UAMS Office of Research and Sponsored Programs.  She also served as an IRB Administrator in the Institutional Review Board office for the protection of human subjects in research.  Her current legal experience involves federal and state grants and contracts, employment law, and federal research grants administration. Allison is thrilled to be a member of the NALS Editorial Board and enjoys reading all the articles and writing.


References:

1 Sabin, W. (2010). The Gregg Reference Manual: A Manual of Style, Grammar, Usage, and Formatting Tribute Edition 11th Edition. New York City, NY: McGraw-Hill Education.
2 http://proofthatblog.com/about-proof-that/
3 http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/grammar-girl
4 Strunk, W., & White, E.B. (1999). The Elements of Style. London, United Kingdom: Pearson PLC.


Tags:  career corner  editing legal papers  legal access  legal assistant  legal career  legal education  legal networking  legal professional  nals  paralegal  paralegal career  writing legal documents 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

BUILDING YOUR CAREER ON SELF-CONFIDENCE

Posted By Tashania Morris, ALS, CDF, CPC, Tuesday, May 24, 2016

Paralegal Career Corner

Paralegal Career Corner Header 

“Whether you think you can, or you think you can't—you're right.”  ~ Henry Ford

 

Self-confidence is believing in yourself.  It is knowing that you have the ability to get the job done.  Being able to articulate your strengths and abilities to your potential boss is the key to get from where you are now to where you want to be.  Most people advance in their careers because they know what they want and they go after it.  If you do not believe you can get the job done, how will you be able to convince the person in the interview to hire you?  Good sales people are confident in the product they are selling.  You are your own product—sell it well! 


Study your craft

 

If you are new to an industry and feel a little intimidated, this is natural; however, you will have to study your craft to become great at it.  Some people feel that learning ends once they have graduated from college.  Continuing education and personal development should never end.  In the legal world, things change constantly.  Judges’ requirements and laws are constantly updated and it is extremely important to keep up to date with these changes.  Seeking out learning opportunities on your own will be one of the best things you can do for your career.  In Outliers, Malcolm Gladwell says it takes ten thousand hours of practice to become an expert.  Sometimes you will have to be the first one in and the last one out.  As a newbie in the legal field, I used to volunteer for everything at my firm whether I knew how to do it or not.  I wanted to be on every project even if it meant coming in on the weekends and staying late at night.  After overhearing a conversation, I remember volunteering to prepare title claims and deed in lieu documents.  At the time I did not even know what they were—I had never seen or heard of them before.  It was a steep learning curve and I made a couple of errors along the way, but I had a great boss who enjoyed my enthusiasm and desire to learn. 

 

Self-Doubt and Pep Talks

 

Self–doubt is inevitable—everyone feels this at some point in their lives.  Questioning yourself and your abilities will occur occasionally.  The problem is allowing self-doubt to linger.  Napoleon Hill once said, “Whatever the mind can conceive and believe, it will achieve.”  You will have to learn the value of self-talk and become your biggest cheerleader.  Do not allow self-doubt to eat away at your self-confidence.  As a way of overcoming self-doubt, some people say affirmations in the morning or read scriptures that help to center their thoughts and renew their confidence within themselves.  It is about changing your mindset.  Even if you have family and friends cheering you on, if you do not believe you can do it you will not.  It starts with you.   

 

I am currently in transition from being a paralegal to becoming an HR professional.  This is new to me and I often feel I am starting over.  Sometimes this comes with a lot of self-doubt—I am leaving something I am familiar with to enter a world that is new to me and, while it is challenging, I love HR and the passion drives me.  Ultimately the biggest battle you will have to fight and win is with yourself. 

 

Creating a Good Support System

 

Find an advocate at work, someone who is willing to mentor you in your professional development.  They can help you navigate the workplace and give you tips on how to improve.  It is always great to build connections within your place of employment.  Having external mentors is essential to your career development as well.  This gives you someone you can vent to about what is going on at work and never have to worry about it getting back to the boss.  When you are down, it is wonderful to have people around you to remind you of how great you are.


Starting a new career and/or looking for new job opportunities can be scary, but self-confidence and perseverance can take you far.  I was encouraged by an interview I saw with Jack Ma, the founder of Alibaba.  In his interview he spoke about the importance of not giving up.  He is quoted as saying, “I failed 3 times in college.  I applied 30 times to get a job but I have always been rejected.  When KFC came to China for the first time, we were 24 to apply and I was the one to be dismissed.  I wanted to go into the police and 5 postulants, I was the only one not to be accepted.  I applied 10 times to return to Harvard University USA and I was rejected.”  It takes a lot of self-confidence to be able to pick yourself up and move forward after being rejected so many times.  It all starts and ends with you.  Had he given up or allowed self-doubt to take over, he would not be enjoying the success of Alibaba right now. 

 


 

Tashania Morris, ALS, CDF, CPC, started her career as a paralegal.  She has over six years’ experience in the legal field specializing in the areas of foreclosure and bankruptcy.  She recently completed her master’s degree in human resource management which has equipped her with the tools needed to think strategically and develop creative solutions to problems in the workplace.  As a Certified Professional Coach and Career Development Facilitator, she loves all things career and personal development.  She is able to recognize people’s skills and abilities and enjoys working with individuals to figure out their “why.”  Her mission is to engage, empower, educate, and promote change from within.  If you have any questions about any of the articles written, suggestions about something you would like Tashania to write about, or enjoyed reading the article, send her a quick note.  You can reach Tashania at tashania_m@hotmail.com.

Tags:  administrative  career corner  legal  legal assistant  legal networking  legal professional  paralegal  paralegal career 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

May Grammar Nuggets

Posted By Kathy Sieckman, PP, PLS-SC, AC, Tuesday, May 17, 2016
Updated: Tuesday, May 17, 2016

NALS Paralegal Professionals - Grammar Nuggets - Proof That Blog KathyPretty Is As Pretty Does

 

One of the important pieces of proofreading is making sure your document looks good (in addition to being accurate). Here are some tips for aesthetically pleasing documents:

 

Avoid widow and orphan lines. Those are the single lines or words at the top of a page (widow) or at the bottom of the page (orphans). In a Word document, use the para widow orphan control feature to keep widows and orphans away.

Check to see if the entire document is justified or not justified. Particularly where there is a lot of cutting and pasting or several people working on the document, you may see that some paragraphs are justified while others are not. Consistency is what matters. Decide which to use and make sure all the paragraphs are that style.

Is the spacing even? Some paragraphs could be double, some could be 24 space, some could be 1.5 lines. To some people, that would all look “close enough,” but to someone checking how a document looks, it will be noticed (and judges and opposing counsel may well notice it too).

Are the margins even on every page? Make sure the margins match paragraph to paragraph and page to page. Something I see a lot is where someone pulls the right-hand margin in for a quotation and it does not get changed back to the original margin.

Do the headings line up at the same tab stop consistently throughout the document and are they numbered consecutively? This is an important step in the process. Sometimes one last run-through just to check paragraph numbers is worth it. It is much better than opposing counsel objecting to a paragraph because there are two paragraphs numbered 3 and no number 5. It is best to set up styles and number that way, but no matter which way you go, at least check it.

Are the headings that are supposed to be centered actually centered? If there is a tab set on the same line as the heading, it will center between that tab and the end of the line. Be sure to check there are no tabs set on that line.

If you, the author, or the client insists that a document line up with pleading paper line numbers, try to get it there. It takes time and can be highly frustrating, particularly if there are headings that are single spaced when the body is 24 space, but you can get close. And it really does look much nicer to have it all aligned with the numbers (and it is easier to refer back in a subsequent document to a page and line number if necessary).

 

Following these steps will help you have a document that looks like someone cared enough to make it look right—because YOU cared.


 

Kathy Sieckman, PP, PLS-SC, ACP, has been a member of NALS for over 30 years, is the current President of NALS of Phoenix, and is the Vice Chair of the NALS Editorial Board. Kathy has a blog on proofreading tips at http://proofthatblog.com. If you have specific grammar issues you would like covered in future issues, please send them to Kathy at proofthatblog@gmail.com.

 

Tags:  Accredited Legal Professional  administrative  grammar  grammar nuggets  legal  legal professional  office procedures  paralegal 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

My Cousin Vinny and the Future of Legal Education

Posted By Alberto Bernabe [1], Monday, May 16, 2016
Updated: Wednesday, May 11, 2016

Next year will be the twenty-fifth anniversary of the release of the film the ABA Journal named the third best legal film of all time. I am not sure that I agree with that designation, but the fact it was so named tells you how highly regarded the movie is by the members of the legal profession.  This is a bit unusual for a number of reasons, one of them being the fact the movie is a comedy.  The movie, as you might have guessed from the title of this column, is My Cousin Vinny.  Although it was released so long ago, there is no question it continues to resonate with lawyers. So why has Vinny endured? 

 

“Hollywood,” or more accurately the American movie industry, has always been fascinated by the law.  Many famous “classic” movies are related to legal themes and every year new law related movies are released.  (My favorite from last year was Bridge of Spies.)  Whether it is because of an interest in historical events, crime and punishment, tales of justice for the wronged, or stories of redemption, legal themes have always been part of the movies.

 

I often talk about movies with my students and when they ask me for recommendations I give them a list I have prepared over the years in which I have organized the titles under certain main “themes.” [2]  No one is surprised to see My Cousin Vinny on the list, but some are surprised I have listed it under the theme of “legal education.”

 

The film stars Joe Pesci as Vincent Gambini, a newly admitted New York lawyer who agrees to represent a family member and his friend facing the death penalty for a murder they did not commit in Alabama.  Having failed the bar exam a few times, it would be Gambini’s first trial, of any kind, ever. 

 

There are, as usual, a number of inaccuracies about the practice of law in the movie and to enjoy the film, one has to ignore those details.  But, as many of the reviews of the movie written by lawyers have argued, unlike in other movies where the action is fictionalized to create a compelling drama, My Cousin Vinny uses humor to illustrate a lot of truth: the reality of limited budgets, limited preparation, impatient judges, hostile expert witnesses, ruined dress suits, hopelessly mangled questions, completely fruitless arguments, and stress.  Everything that happens in the trial in Vinny could happen and sometimes does happen in real life.

 

This is one reason I place My Cousin Vinny under the theme of legal education.  It provides so much material you can use in the classroom.  For example, you can use the movie to discuss criminal procedure, courtroom decorum, professional responsibility, unethical behavior, the role of the judge in a trial, efficient cross-examination, the role of expert witnesses, and effective trial advocacy.

 

But the reference to legal education goes deeper.  I think you can use the movie to discuss the most common topic of debate within legal education itself: how to make sure that after only three years in law school, graduates are “practice ready.”  Interestingly, however, in My Cousin Vinny, the issue is turned on its head.

 

After Vinny’s girlfriend Mona Lisa bails him out for a second time after having been found in contempt, she criticizes his performance in court and tells him it is pretty clear he does not know what he is doing.  She then utters one of my favorite lines in the movie: “Don’t they teach you that in law school?”  Vinny’s response is just as classic: “NO!  They teach you Contracts . . . !”  Obviously, the implication is that in law school they teach “law” not “how to practice law.”

 

There are many ironic twists to this short exchange.  First, as to those “things” that his girlfriend was referring to, we do teach you that in law school!  Vinny may not have learned them—or may have forgotten them—but we do teach them!  But Vinny is right that there are many things you need to know to practice law effectively that we do not teach in law school.

 

Which brings me to the reason I say the movie turns the issue on its head.  Vinny is terrible at the things we do teach in law school, but very good at the things we don’t.

 

Although Vinny is certainly no role model when it comes to knowledge of the law, legal analysis, and ethical behavior, law students could learn from him how to use legal thinking in the complexity of actual law practice.  Vinny needs to learn legal analysis, that which law schools are best equipped to teach, while many of today’s graduates need to learn how to develop Vinny’s inherent ability to interview clients, to gather facts, to prepare a theory of a case, to negotiate, to know when to ask a question and when to remain quiet, to cross examine a witness forcefully—but with charm—in order to expose the weaknesses in their testimony, to pick your battles, and to know how to make an effective opening statement.

 

To be successful, like Vinny, all law graduates need to develop both their analytical knowledge and their practical skills.  And, also like Vinny, they often need to learn to accept the fact that they need help. Like Vinny, they cannot do it all alone.  Were it not for his girlfriend, Vinny’s attempt to practice law would have ended in a disaster and, possibly, in disbarment.   We can all learn from that lesson too.

 

Thus, in the end, what My Cousin Vinny teaches us about legal education is that law schools can and should complement the focus on legal analysis with an introduction to practice skills, but also that to expect law schools to make all students ready to practice law by themselves right after graduation after only three years of studies is a bit naive.  As stressed in the final report of an ABA Task Force on legal education back in 1992 (the year Vinny was released), both the academic institutions and the practicing bar need to understand that they have complementary duties toward the development of skills in new graduates.


 

Alberto Bernabe is a Professor of Law at The John Marshall Law School in Chicago, Illinois, where he teaches Professional Responsibility and Torts.

 

[1] Professor of Law, The John Marshall Law School

[2] You can see the list here:  https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B_e2ysf5cfS6RGZoU2J3T1BrbnM/edit

 

Tags:  legal  legal professional  paralegal 

Share |
Permalink
 
Page 2 of 2
1  |  2
more Calendar

3/21/2018 » 9/15/2018
NALS Traveling Gavel Challenge

3/21/2018 » 3/21/2019
NALS 2018 Online Leadership Course + Discussion

4/1/2018 » 6/30/2018
NALS Foundation Full Circle 5K

4/16/2018 » 4/16/2019
Online ALP Exam

Featured
Amylyn Riedling PP PLS-SC2018 NALS Board of Directors
Nakia A. Bradley-Lawson2018 NALS Board of Directors

CLE Opportunities
Association Management Software Powered by YourMembership  ::  Legal